Moving Forward

“Push off into the middle of the river,” intones a line from a poem featured in Hopi Elder Speaks.  A friend sent it to me.  She is a powerful force whom I’ve met through my work with women and transition.  An octogenarian, she leads a global not-for-profit, participates in several wisdom networks and is in a constant state of organizational prep for events, issues and causes that are important to her.  I met with her to gain some knowledge about how to architect what today looks like an impossible task.  My quest?  I’d like to educate women everywhere about the importance of transitioning.  My new friend gave me volumes of contacts and helpful specifics.  But she also gave me something more important.  The courage to keep going. Continue reading

How we engage others

“You’ll be one of the best next year,” offered my son. Unprompted.  He is eleven.  We were in the kitchen.  It was Sunday three weeks ago.  I’d just decided to not participate in a sprint triathlon, an event for which I’d been training for months.   A quirky injury sidelined me.  I was crushed.    In the grand scheme of things this was minor – hardly a blip.   If I was still pre-transition, I would have simply gone on that day and not said a word about it to anyone.  Instead, my transition inspired me to give voice to my disappointment.  I was struck by my son’s humanity and emotional intelligence.  Our typical exchanges are single words conveyed over an electronic device.   His pivot made me reflect on how much of myself I can bring to interactions with others.   It is my choice just like it was his.  I can mimic the sentiment of his single word responses or his deft comment.  How much of my voice do I choose to engage? Continue reading

Our Elusive Self

Have you ever felt as if you are bumping into the same issue over and over again?   Everywhere you turn?   Such events may be reminding you that it is time to start your own business or leave a fallen marriage or pick up the phone to call a long-silent friend.  I am a little disturbed and amazed at how frequently I keep bumping into something of my own lately.   It keeps happening.  I can’t name it although I think it has something to do with identity.  My identity?   I’ve been transitioning for the better part of five years. Could there be more to do?


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Giving Ourselves Permission

“I gave myself permission – thanks to being a part of this group ,” said Stephanie.  She was crediting a multi-session working group that I put together to help me develop a workbook, a companion to my book, Women & Transition.    Over the course of our sessions together we learned that Stephanie had been laid off a year earlier from her job as a research and development manager for a tech behemoth, a job that she’d held in some form or another for almost twenty years.  We also learned that our work together helped her dignify a small voice in her head that kept leading her away from R&D and tech.  She was excited and scared about her new path.  I was really struck by her words.  I felt as if she and I were in the same place.   How could this be?   My transition is farther down the garden path than hers.   Isn’t  it?   What was it about permission that spoke to me?

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Audio Book Giveaway

Do you need the perfect audio book for your morning commute or for an upcoming summer road trip?  To celebrate my book’s release on Audible I’m giving away three free copies of the audio version of Women & Transition: Reinventing Work and Life!

Women & Transition

To enter simply send an email to with the subject Audio Book Giveaway.  Three winners will be chosen at random from the entries.  Entries must be received by Sunday, June 5th to be eligible.

The audio book is available at no extra cost to Audible subscribers or for $14.95. Amazon is offering the audio version at a substantial discount from the book’s hardcover price of $35!  Purchase a copy for yourself or request it at your local library.

About the book:

Women & Transition: Reinventing Work and Life introduces a new way of thinking about the events that shape women’s adult lives – like childbirth or career change or empty nests – and offers a step-by-step toolkit designed to help women transition successfully. The book chronicles the real life transition story of author Linda Rossetti, a Harvard MBA, entrepreneur, corporate executive and mom, and the stories of more than 200 other women who shared their transition experiences with her.   The book repositions transition as positive and optimistic, a substantive departure from the negative characteristics typically ascribed to it.

What are people saying about the book?

The book has a 5 star rating on with more than 50 reviews.  Here are some excerpts:

  • “The book is amazing…”
  • “This is a great book and has led me to change my outlook on the current transition.”
  • “Linda’s book provides clarity & language to a topic long misunderstood”
  • “GREAT book, so on point, every women should read this regardless of where she is in her life/career.”
  • “Move over Gloria Steinem and Helen Gurley Brown. Linda Rossetti has written a book for all women who want to give voice to their dreams..”

Don’t miss this chance to win a free audio version of this provocative book!


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“I don’t know,” said my twelve-year-old daughter earlier this week in response to a benign question I asked her about choosing a movie.  Her tone was light-hearted if not a little distracted.  My heart fell as I listened to her response.  How could she not know?  I hoped we’d avoid this unknowing if only for a few more years.  Have you ever heard yourself say a similar statement?  I don’t know. Continue reading

Big and Small Victories

“Be who you are in big and small ways,” said Colleen DelVecchio, Director of Alumni Engagement at Smith College.  She spoke at the close of a two-day Leadership Conference, a conference that had invited me to speak about my book!  She challenged all of us there to bring our voices to every stage on which we find ourselves – from paying for coffee at a local independent coffee bar; to landing a sought after contract; to shepherding a child through the college admissions process.  To her the size of the stage was irrelevant.  What mattered was bringing ourselves to every situation. No deferring or diminishing or denying our voices.  She implored us to bring them forward…in countless ways.



She wasn’t aware of it but Colleen DelVecchio was talking about an important element of transition: exercising our voices.   She – like so many of the people I encounter – overlooked transition.  Or, was it that she lacked insight into this important topic?

As I listened to her I immediately felt the distance that I’ve traveled in transition.  A journey that is underscored today by an incredible milestone, Novofemina’s fifth anniversary!

To those of you who have walked this journey with me, thank you from the bottom of my heart.  For those who are newer to our conversation, I thank you for choosing this topic.  To both camps, I am thrilled that you’re here with me.

When I began Novofemina I thought transition was a process that would allow me to reconcile conflicts between my professional and personal lives.  I approached it like a project management challenge.  I expected tasks and phases and gates and a final – albeit uncertain – deliverable.   A new job?  A new way of working?  I wasn’t certain what transition held for me but I knew that something had to give.

Today thanks to the voices of hundreds of women with whom I’ve spoken about transition my work is focused on a cause that engages my entire soul, a cause that I believe has positive implications for women.  The cause?  Transition.  Or more specifically, I am on a crusade to increase the capacity for transition in women – everywhere.

Transition occurs when there is a shift in what holds value or meaning to each of us.  It is a process that we choose when faced with the need to change.  It requires us to re-examine our assumptions about who we are – our identity, our capacity, our values.  The choice part is important.  A person can undergo hundreds of changes in their life and never transition.  The choice is ours.

I’ve concluded that transition is widely misunderstood in our society.  Few know it as a normal part of adult growth and development.   This mismatch leads many to misinterpret transition’s earliest stages as failure.

Women’s response to this – very often – is to draw inward.   This response can fuel feelings of inadequacy and self-doubt, a treacherous cycle that can cause women to stall, disengage or retreat from living the lives they imagine.

I remember vividly the earliest days of my transition.  It started one day when I crossed an imaginary line – that day the bottom fell out on the meaning of my professional world.   That world was complex and all-consuming. Harvard Business School MBA.  Million mile member of American Airlines’ Frequent Flyer program.  Executive in the c suite of a Fortune 500.  All of a sudden one day I said to myself, “this couldn’t be all there is?” as I looked across the room at my peers – the ceo and the presidents of the company’s geographic regions.

It happened in an instant.

I remember saying to myself, “There must be more for me.”  This glint of possibility kept me going but it didn’t shield me from the instant onslaught of negative feelings.  Failure. Guilt.  Shame.  Isolation.  Fear.

Fast forward to Smith College just before Collen DelVecchio spoke.   I had just finished leading a seminar about transition with 60 women.  Thanks to my book, Women & Transition: Reinventing Work and Life, I get invited to this type of event more and more these days.

That morning a woman who sat near the back of the room caught my eye.  Why?  She had tears in her eyes for a good portion of my talk.  At the end of the workshop she smiled at me and then made her way to the front of the room where I was talking with a handful of other participants.  She interrupted us with a simple emphatic statement, “This was excellent.”

Another woman who had attended that day and also bought my book later wrote me an email.  She shared that she’d been in a difficult transition for more than a decade.   She said,   “This week I have felt better about where I’m at and what I have to work through then I have in a long time. I thank you for opening this door for me.”

These moments – while small – are incredibly meaningful to me.  They fuel me and offer me support as I explore how my transition will continue.  Even though a book and formal research weren’t on my radar screen as my transition began I know that they are not its end.  There is more….

At 5 I am ebullient and peaceful and open.    I’ve traveled an enormous distance.   The fear and uncertainty have been replaced by understanding and by optimism even in the face of more unknowing.  While difficultly is likely ahead of me as I take on more and more of my transition I am ever grateful of the path and its countless gifts.

I hope that soon Colleen DelVecchio and many others become aware of transition.  It is a journey that many of us will find ourselves on during our adult lives.   It is a journey whose course and pace you get to decide.  It is enlivening and energizing and freeing.

The only true risk in it all is that you begin.   An act that can happen in countless ways – both big and small.

Many many thanks…..


If you have another moment, please read my prior Anniversary Posts:

First Year:  Learnings & Laughs: One Year In

Second Year:  400 and 2

Third Year:  Three and Counting

Fourth Year:  Four and Foresight


Copyright © 2016  All rights reserved. No content on this site may be reused in any fashion without written permission from





A little courage

“That takes a lot of courage,” commented a journalist who joined me for a breakfast conversation a few weeks ago.  Her remark followed my story of transition, a route that caused me to step away from a path I’d pursued for more than twenty years.   She was interviewing me for a publication.  I told her about  my observation that transitions occur when there is a shift in what holds value or meaning to us.   It is that moment – that shift – when we’re faced with a choice that so captivates me.  Do we move?   Why? Or why not?  Honestly as she remarked about ‘courage‘ I couldn’t help but wonder if it really is the exact opposite…. Continue reading

A shield

“They only talked about their children,” said my exasperated friend Stephanie.  She and her family recently relocated to Phoenix thanks to her husband’s new job.  Once on the ground she met women in various places;  the nursery school, the transfer station, the local IEEE chapter.   She had high hopes when she hosted a networking event in her home.  Needless to say she sounded crestfallen as she described the evening.  Most of those she invited were working part-time or trying to re-engage in the full-time workforce.  A few were entrepreneurs.  “Don’t they get it?”  Continue reading

Strengthening Our Resolve

“I can hear my voice,” shared a teary-eyed women who introduced herself to me last week at the conclusion of a seminar I conducted in a leafy suburb on the outskirts of Boston.  “It is screaming at me,”  she said.   She went on to tell me about how emotional she’d been throughout the seminar – a two-hour affair designed to let participants play with the concepts of transition.    She was clear about the action she needed to take.  She knew it.  It didn’t eliminate the sheer terror she felt as she contemplated taking that next step.   Her comment instantly deposited me at the doorstep of actions.  In this season of New Year’s resolutions and renewed personal commitments – are you readying to act? Continue reading